One Last Dash of Athens

And you can tell we’ve reached a bit of a travel wall. We’re tired, and occasionally cranky.  Us and D. Yesterday we had a bit of a lazy day, and after a false start or two, we finally got going, only to miss the bus we needed and scrap our museum plans for the day. Instead, we checked out another local game store (one guess on whose idea that was), then went to the main bus station to get our bus tickets for tomorrow’s journey. We ate at a nearby restaurant we tried to go to earlier in the week, but was closed, and it was fabulous. A Greek-Egyptian fusion restaurant. We had baba ganoush, I had octopus in a fava bean purée, Z had koftka, a veal/lamb kebab with rice/veggies and cous cous. So delicious. They were very sweet to D, and won over his patience by giving him a zoo sticker/coloring book. 

  

Fried octopus and fava bean puree.

  

Koftka, Z’s meal.

  

Sticker book fun.

 
Today we went to the Hellenic Childrens Museum in Athens, a big thumbs up for a free museum, perfect for kids 6 and under. D had a blast in the water area, kitchen area, and playing with wood beads. 

 

This kid loves playing in water.

  

This place had an extensive play market and play kitchen area. D chose an apple and some fish and scallops for food. Yum!

 
We then walked to the Acropolis museum, which is a pretty new museum that houses a lot of the artifacts from the Acropolis, Parthenon, Roman Agora, and Ancient Agora. It was very beautiful, but did not allow pictures inside. Even with the stroller the museum provided (awesome, and first time we’ve had a stroller in 3 weeks), D decided he would not, could not take a nap, and screamed instead. After I was politely suggested to check out the baby room by one of the museum guards due to D’s vocal aerobics, we took a step back, got D some food, and tried the museum again after a blah expensive turkey sandwich from the museum cafe. He mostly cooperated this time, but I was not allowed to slow down too much. So I pretty much looked like a crazy person, circling items a few times with the stroller so I could look at them and read the informational plaque, and keep D moving. 

After narrowly surviving the museum, we eventually found somewhere to eat. Again, delicious food, and D kept himself busy sort-of eating some kind of mild pepperoncino in olive oil (he would stick it in his mouth, then made a face, blew a raspberry, and repeat). We had a mini adventure hunting down fresh milk for D when we got back to the neighborhood we are staying in, since everything is closed on Sundays. Thank goodness for mini markets. 

  

Ancient ruins under the Acropolis Museum.


 

A dark picture of us in front of the parliment building. Photo editor, I am not.

  

As for the banking crisis and impending decision regarding the financial future of Greece, we really haven’t seen a big impact on things related to tourism here. Sites and museums have been open, public transportation running, restaurants full of people. There seem to be a lot of other tourists, and no shortage of Americans. We did have some trouble finding an ATM with money in it today, and we have seen short lines of people waiting at some ATMs. There is a lot of graffiti for either “yes” or “no” in Greek related to the vote last week. The other night we heard some protestors from our apartment, but nothing big. We’re hoping the rest of trip continues to go well, and for now, we hope we have enough cash to get us through Greece.

Tomorrow we leave for Delphi- what was considered the center of the world in ancient times and where you could speak to the Oracle to get guidance for your life. It is supposed to be a pretty beautiful site, and will be a different part of Greece for us to see. We just ask that you keep us in your thoughts as we have a three hour bus ride to brave tomorrow, and then Thursday when we head back to Athens before heading into the Greek Isles. 

Fingers crossed that we will find some magic to keep D entertained. 

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